Volunteer Coordination for January 21, 2019

The Volunteer Reception Center (VRC) will open tomorrow at 8:00am to 5:00pm at the DHR Office 8961 US Hwy 231, Wetumpka.  They will not be accepting any more volunteers after 3:00pm. To be able to volunteer, you must be 18 years of age or have a parent’s permission (under 13 is prohibited).  There are two staging areas set up for volunteers after initial registration at the VRC, Wetumpka High School and Wetumpka Football Stadium (Heavy Equipment).  Wetumpka Fire Department is assigning volunteers to the damaged areas.  The VRC is only accepting local volunteers tomorrow.

Volunteer Coordination Information

Volunteers that are looking to help with the clean-up efforts in downtown Wetumpka or in the county should contact the Elmore County EMA office at (334) 567-6451 beginning at 8 am Sunday January 20, 2019.  The Elmore County Commission and City of Wetumpka are appreciative of volunteers wanting to assist, but want to ensure coordination to maximize recovery efforts and resources.

Staging area for volunteers will be at 8961 US Hwy 231. This address is for the north parking lot of the Elmore County Judicial Complex and Elmore County DHR office.

With Cold Temp’s Remember the 4 P’s: People, Pets, Plants, and Pipes

In anticipation of the cold air mass moving in to our area Sunday bringing colder temperatures and wind chills in the teens, Elmore County EMA would like to remind our citizens of the 4 P’s:  People, Pets, Plants, and Pipes.

  • People – should dress warmly, in layers, to avoid hypothermia (abnormally low body temperature).
  • Pets – should be brought indoors or provided with a warm place to sleep.
  • Pipes – that run outside or under a house should be wrapped in pipe insulation to avoid cracks due to water freezing in them.
  • Plants – may need to be covered or brought inside to avoid frost damage.

Health Hazards

Did you know that prolonged exposure to the cold can become life-threatening? Frostbite and hypothermia are both serious health conditions, and hypothermia can be fatal.

Frostbite – damage to body tissue caused by extreme cold. A wind chill of -20°F will cause frostbite in 30 minutes or less!

  • Signs: A loss of feeling and a white/pale appearance in extremities, such as fingers, toes, ear lobes, or the tip of the nose.
  • Action: Get medical help immediately! If you must wait for help, slowly rewarm affected areas. However, if the person is also showing signs of hypothermia, warm the body core before the extremities.

Hypothermia – An abnormally low body temperature (<95°F). It can kill!

  • Signs: Uncontrollable shivering, memory loss, disorientation, incoherence, slurred speech, drowsiness and apparent exhaustion.
  • Action: Seek medical help immediately if the person’s body temperature is below 95°F! If medical care is not available, warm the person slowly, starting with the body core.

Safety & Preparedness

Although it may not happen frequently, Central Alabama does see significant impacts from winter weather. NOW is the time to prepare and finalize your winter preparedness plans. Make sure your NOAA Weather Radio has fresh batteries in it. Make sure you have a means of receiving winter weather information, and be prepared in case you have no way to travel. Injuries and deaths due to winter weather can be prevented through proper winter safety measures

The following graphics cover important safety and preparedness information, whether you are at home or traveling.

 

 

“If You See Something, Say Something!”

From the U.S. Dept. of Homeland Security

It Takes a Community to Protect a Community

“If You See Something, Say Something™” is a national campaign that raises public awareness of the indicators of terrorism and terrorism-related crime, as well as the importance of reporting suspicious activity to state and local law enforcement.

Informed, alert communities play a critical role in keeping our nation safe. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is committed to strengthening hometown security by creating partnerships with state, local, tribal, and territorial (SLTT) governments and the private sector, as well as the communities they serve. These partners help us reach the public across the nation by displaying the campaign’s messages and distributing outreach materials, including Public Service Announcements (PSAs).

We can all help keep our communities safe by paying attention to our surroundings and reporting suspicious activity to local law enforcement.

Fire Prevention Week: October 7 – 13, 2018 ~ Look. Listen. Learn. Be Aware. Fire Can Happen Anywhere.

This year’s Fire Prevention Week’s campaign, “Look. Listen. Learn. Be aware. Fire can happen anywhere,” works to educate people about three basic but essential steps to take to reduce the likelihood of having a fire––and how to escape safely in the event of one.

For more information about Fire Prevention visit this website: Fire Prevention Week

National Cyber Security Awareness Month ~ Week 2~ Millions of Rewarding Jobs: Educating for a Career in Cyber Security

Week 2 of National Cybersecurity Awareness

A key risk to our economy and security continues to be the shortage of cybersecurity professionals to safeguard our ever-expanding cyber ecosystem. Raising the next generation of interested and capable cybersecurity professionals is a starting point to building stronger defenses. There are limitless opportunities to educate students of all ages – from high school into higher education and beyond – on the field of cybersecurity as they consider their options. In addition, veterans and individuals who are looking for a new career or re-entering the workforce, should explore the multitude of well-paying and rewarding jobs available. Week 2 will address ways to motivate parents, teachers and counselors to learn more about the field and how to best inspire students and others to seek highly fulfilling cybersecurity careers.

Learn more about Guiding kids into careers in cybersecurity

“If You See Something, Say Something!”

From the U.S. Dept. of Homeland Security

It Takes a Community to Protect a Community

“If You See Something, Say Something™” is a national campaign that raises public awareness of the indicators of terrorism and terrorism-related crime, as well as the importance of reporting suspicious activity to state and local law enforcement.

Informed, alert communities play a critical role in keeping our nation safe. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is committed to strengthening hometown security by creating partnerships with state, local, tribal, and territorial (SLTT) governments and the private sector, as well as the communities they serve. These partners help us reach the public across the nation by displaying the campaign’s messages and distributing outreach materials, including Public Service Announcements (PSAs).

We can all help keep our communities safe by paying attention to our surroundings and reporting suspicious activity to local law enforcement.